Whale Watching in Victoria

One of my favourite tourist activities in port cities and towns is whale watching. I love the ocean. I love getting out on a boat, smelling the salt in the air and scanning the horizon for a glimpse of sea creatures.

This Fall we took a day trip to Victoria and went whale watching with Springtide Whale Watching and Eco Tours. We were on one of their 60 foot motor yachts, the Marauder IV. The boot can accommodate 84 passengers plus crew. It was a pretty comfortable boat with a few options for sitting or standing on multiple decks. Susannah and I went immediately up to the bow to get a good photography spot where we’d be easily able to see over both sides of the boat.

We cruised out of Victoria Harbour and once out into open water the captain sped the boat up and away we went. Up at the bow, it got pretty bumpy so we sat down on the deck for awhile. It also got really cold and although we had brought extra layers we were very grateful for the jackets that the crew offered to everybody.

It wasn’t long before we spotted our first whale – a humpback. We tracked it for awhile and watched it arch and dive, sending water cascading over its beautiful tail.

It’s amazing how a whale can be identified by its unique colouring and markings with scratches and nicks accumulated over its lifetime.

Watching closely we realised our humpback was not alone – there were two! In the next couple of photos, you can see them together.

We were not the only ones watching – here is the Orca Spirit Adventures tour.

It seems like the whale watching companies have pretty good peer relationships so there was no competition to get closer than each other or to do anything that might harm the whales. That’s very important to us and why we select “Eco” tours. This boat looks super close but they weren’t moving and also the photo is taken with a very long lens which compresses distance.

The next photo shows you the size of a humpback whale compared to a tanker. It may also give you an idea of how busy shipping lanes could negatively impact whales.

We traveled around in search of more marine wildlife but failed to find any other cetaceans. We were taken to a little island with hopes to see seals, otters or maybe even an Orca. Our trip took place near the end of the massive BC forest fires which meant that the sky was very smoky and hazy. It was kind of eerie.

We saw harbour seals sunning themselves on the rocks.

There was some nice birdlife as well.

Our onboard naturalist gave an interesting talk about kelp and its uses and we even got to taste some freshly cut. Then we motored back to port to end our trip.

Whale watching is always unpredictable as you never know what you are going to see. Although there were no Orcas for us this time around, we did enjoy the majesty of the humpbacks.

We coupled this excursion with a morning visit to Victoria Butterfly Gardens. Together with our lovely afternoon out on the water, this made a great day trip from Vancouver.  As always, Victoria did not disappoint.

Kayaking at Bowen Island

A few years ago Susannah and I decided to get away from the city for awhile so we moved to Bowen Island. We found an amazing house on the West Side of the Island, not far from Bowen Bay. In the Fall, not long after we moved, I had a medical procedure for back problems and at the same time, I came off some pretty hardcore prescription pain medicine. Our location on the Island was very quiet and peaceful, so it was a great place to recover and recuperate. We went for long walks in the forest, enjoyed watching deer hanging out in the backyard and saw the most amazing sunsets at the beach. After 6 months, we reluctantly decided it was time to move back to the City, so in the Spring our Island adventure came to an end.

One thing we never had a chance to do while on Bowen was kayak, so after we moved back to Vancouver we decided to revisit on a day trip. For my birthday we went back to Bowen Island and across to Bowen Bay. After launching we had to choose to paddle left or right. We headed to the right with the intention of sticking to the coastline but then we heard something amazing.

Across the water, floated a sound of deep exhalation. And again. We looked over the water and spotted a dorsal fin of and Orca as it surfaced. Then another. Then another. We changed our course and headed towards Pasley Island. There appeared to be 3-4 Killer Whales swimming not too far off the Coast.

We were very careful not to get too close (all images here are taken with a long zoom lens). Canadian law states that any vessel should stay 100m away from whales. We paddled to about that distance and then stopped to observe. It was hard to tell where they were going to surface and for awhile they seemed to be heading West but then an Orca surfaced unexpectedly close to us. So close in fact that Susannah had to reverse paddle to retain a respectable distance between us and them.


Orca tailslapping

The sound they made when surfacing to exhale was amazing. Watching them was incredible. There was one large male whose huge dorsal fin was quite intimidating.


We quietly watched them for about an hour before they headed out into open water and we paddled back to the beach.

After a bit of a rest and some “OMG” debriefing time we ventured out again and to the left. This time we were treated to some cool bird life.

Belted Kingfisher (female)



We returned to the beach to watch the sunset and then headed down to Snug Cove to grab some food before catching the ferry home.

An experience like this is totally random and lucky (we could have paddled left and not seen them at all!) and I am incredibly grateful for receiving it. It was a magical day and definitely a birthday to remember.

We took our own kayaks but there are rental kayaks available at Snug Cove. Bown Island Sea Kayaking offers lessons, rentals and guided tours from April till October. Have a go – I’m sure you’ll love it!