Hiking Quarry Rock in Deep Cove

The Quarry Rock hike in Deep Cove, North Vancouver, is super popular with both locals and tourists. It’s a 3.8km round trip walk, takes between 1-2 hours, has an elevation gain of 100m, and offers fantastic views from the top.

Starting at Deep Cove, follow the signs for the Baden Powell Trail. Once you enter the forest be prepared to begin the stair master as much of the elevation gain seems to occur in the first part of this hike. After several sets of stairs, the trail becomes a bit more natural with a maze of tree roots to navigate (watch your footing!) and several ups and downs through the forest.

Stay on the trail until you reach a fork. Go right and you’ll have reached Quarry Rock. Climb up and enjoy the view! It’s cool to be able to look down on Deep Cove and see just how high you’ve climbed.

Before heading back, walk a few minutes further along the Baden Powell Trail towards the power pylon. Once you reach it, climb the rock and you’ll get another awesome view further down Indian Arm.


I found the challenge of this hike to be catching my breath going up – take lots of short stops if you need to. If you are a beginner hiker,  not particularly fit, or an older person starting out, this will be a fairly good uphill hike for you but be prepared for the conditions. The trail is open year round but can get very snowy and cold in winter. Even in summer, be prepared.  I found the pounding on my knees going back down to be noticeable – a stick would help. Having said that, there were young and old hiking at many different speeds and there were also a few runners so this trail is pretty good for anybody. It’s very dog-friendly as well.

Deep Cove is extremely popular and even on a weekday outside of the school holidays, we found it difficult to get parking so I’d recommend going early in the day or taking transit. The trail was super busy as well, so it’s not a hike to do if you are looking for some quiet time. I’m not a fan of crowds or busy trails but the views at the top made it totally worthwhile.

Have you hiked to Quarry Rock? Gone further along the trail? Let us know what you thought.

Climbing the Sea to Sky Via Ferrata

What is Via Ferrata? Via Ferrata is Italian for “iron road” and essentially it is a vertical route equipped with anchored rungs and steel cables to aid climbers. This allows inexperienced or new climbers (that’s us!) to explore alpine regions and steep scenic areas that would usually be inaccessible.

We were lucky enough to experience the Via Ferrata with Mountain Skills Academy at the Sea to Sky Gondola in Squamish.

We didn’t really know what to expect when we booked our Via Ferrata experience, and truth be told, I was a little nervous. I’m pretty open to new adventures and I like hiking, but climbing kind of freaks me out. It’s not the climb, it’s gravity and the thought of falling.

Here’s the great thing about Via Ferrata – this style of climbing uses a system of lanyards attached to steel cables which effectively limits the danger of a fall. Whenever you reach an anchored pole, you unhook one carabiner and clip it back onto the cable on the other side of the pole before unhooking the second carabiner. This double clip system means you should always be connected to the cable at all times.

What was it like? Here is a video of our experience – footage shot on a GoPro attached to my helmet.

A synopsis of the climb: We met our guide, Lora, at the top of the gondola where we were fitted with climbing harnesses, helmets and lanyards. Then it was a short hike down the track to the beginning of the Via Ferrata. Lora explained how the system worked and answered our questions and then it was time to climb.

The route started off gently enough and was more of a hike than a climb as we gently traversed around the side of the mountain. This was a good opportunity to get comfortable with the lanyard and carabiner system.

Things got much more vertical once we reached the first ladder.

Our guide Lora making it look so easy!
Yes, I am having fun!

There were just the two of us on our tour which meant we were able to go at our own pace. There was plenty of time to enjoy a few unusual rest stops along the way.

Just chilling on the edge

And take in the views.

Looking towards Sky Pilot Mountain

Once we had conquered the vertical parts, the terrain leveled out quite a bit. Our legs were happy about that! We hiked across a footbridge and around the mountain towards the Summit Lodge. We came up under the suspension bridge and had made it – finishing our climb back at the top.

Yes, we did get very hot and our hands were very dirty from the cables, but the sense of achievement was awesome!

After getting cleaned up, we enjoyed a well-deserved beer on the patio and took in the amazing view before taking the gondola back down.

Mountain Skills Academy have many tours available, including 2 Via Ferrata adventures in BC; this one near Squamish and a 4-hour climb in Whistler. If you are curious but have any reservations about fitness level or ability, we’d recommend trying the Squamish one first. The climb takes about 1.5 hours and for a novice, it’s challenging but not too difficult. The experience is exhilarating and the views are spectacular.

Via Ferrata is a unique and fun adventure. We are really glad we did it and hope to do the Whistler Via Ferrata someday as well.

Let us kow if you’ve tried it too.

Hell’s Gate Airtram

With the fantastic weather we were treated with this Victoria Day long weekend, we thought we’d venture out on a day trip and explore somewhere new. We chose Hells Gate.

Hell’s Gate is located in the southern Fraser Canyon, 2.5 hours drive from Vancouver – ideal for day-tripping.  The name originates with the great explorer Simon Fraser who in 1808 wrote in his journal that “surely this is the gate of hell”, referring to the canyon’s towering cliff faces and the tumultuous water below.

Hell’s Gate Airtram is a scenic attraction (don’t forget your cameras) and one that is steeped in Gold Rush and early explorer history. The Airtram travels across and down into the gorge giving you a bird’s eye view of the mighty Fraser River, the railway and the suspension bridge.

The railway and river as seen from the Tram on the descent

Hell’s Gate Airtram is one of the steepest fully suspended trams in North America,  descending 152m down to the observation deck.



At the bottom, there is a large observation area with plenty of seating, a gift shop, the aptly named Simon’s Cafe, and a fudge and ice-cream shop where you can reward yourself for your bravery! There is also a suspension bridge where you can get a closer view of the roaring water.

Looking upriver with the observation area and cafe on the left

When we visited it was a very hot day so we enjoyed ice-cream outside, watching the tiny birds flitting around the feeders.

A Pine Siskin feeding

Afterward, we walked across the suspension bridge and up to the railway track. Having just visited the Yale Historical Site and reading the history of the railroad and gold rush, we found ourselves marveling at the strength and determination of the early explorers and railway builders.

Facts for the statistically minded: The gorge at Hell’s Gate narrows abruptly to 35m (110ft), causing the fast-flowing water to thunder through the passage. At high water level, over 750,000,000 litres (200,000,000 gallons) of water per minute flow through the gorge. That’s twice the volume of Niagara Falls!

Looking down you get a real sense of the power of the water.

Bird’s eye view of the suspension bridge

For History Buffs: In 1913, while CN was blasting for the passage of the railway, a major rock slide into the river caused a dramatic drop in salmon run numbers. In 1944 Fishways were built at the side of the river to allow salmon to move upstream against a slower current. There is an exhibit at Hell’s Gate detailing the development of the Fishways and the salmon recovery.

Ode to the Salmon

We loved our visit to Hell’s Gate Airtram. It was a great day trip but would also be a nice rest stop for a few hours if you were traveling further.

The scenery was picturesque.

The view from the suspension bridge

Tips: There are two free parking lots; one on each side of the road. If traveling from Hope you can park in the lot on the righthand side of the road and cross the highway via an overpass. If you have mobility concerns, there is a turnaround a bit further along the highway so you can come back and park in the second lot closest to the entrance to avoid the stairs. The facilities are pet-friendly so bring your dog.

Hell’s Gate is open from April 12-October 9 (2017 dates). Canyon Appreciation Day, with admission by donation, is on May 28 this year.  If you are looking for a uniquely BC experience, check it out.

VanDusen Botanical Garden

One of my favourite places to visit in Vancouver is the VanDusen Botanical Garden. The garden is open year round and there is something to see in any season. Different areas are designed to flourish at different times of the year giving the garden a fresh look each time you visit.

Spring is my personal favourite. I love the fresh green of new growth, the colourful spring flowers, and the soft light.

Also, if I’m lucky, I get to see ducklings and goslings – super cute!

Sleepy time
Mama keeping an eye out

After entering the Garden we always beeline towards the far edges of the grounds then work our way back. It’s a large Park and there’s a lot to see with different vegetation starring in each season. The Garden has good maps and info on what to look for and what is peaking at any time. Check out their bloom calendar.

There are sculptures dotted around the grounds and a hedge maze with a Monkey Puzzle Tree at it’s centre – good fun for young and old.

My sister Kristine and bro-in-law Hamish succeed in the maze
Sculptures are throughout the Garden

HINT:  VanDusen has a lovely café but on a sunny day I recommend packing a lunch and bringing a picnic blanket. There’s ample space to stretch out and relax. Special events such as the Sakura Days Japan Fair in April or the Festival of Lights in December are super crowded, but most regular days if you walk away from the entrance to the right or the left you’ll soon get away from the crowds.

A busy day with the Annual Plant sale at VanDusen
A quieter spot

VanDusen Garden is located on Oak Street at West 37th Avenue. They have a good sized free parking lot, but if there is an event on I’d recommend driving past the entrance and making the next right-hand turn as you’ll usually find street parking there.

The Garden is not pet-friendly so leave your four-legged friends at home.

Susannah (right) and I enjoying a late afternoon visit

VanDusen is a great place for photography.  I love capturing the beautiful colours in different light. For photography, you can get nice photos on any camera  – the photos shown here range from DSLR to point and shoot. One suggestion I’ll make is to vary your angles and viewpoints – go high, go low, zoom in, go very wide – changing your point of view can add an interesting element to the images.

The Formal Rose Garden

Keep your eyes open – you never know what you’ll see.

Dragonfly

Have you been to VanDusen Garden? What is your favourite part?

Hiking Capilano Canyon from Cleveland Dam

This 2.6km hike in the Capilano Canyon is great if you want a nice walk, nothing too tricky and/or something that is dog-friendly. The trail begins at the Capilano dam and is a circuit so can be done either clockwise or anti-clockwise. Bear in mind, both ways you’ll head downhill first which will mean some uphill on the way back. The elevation gain is only 100m and the trail is good so it’s not too challenging. There are also a few cross trails if you want something even shorter.

The Cleveland Dam, at the head of the Capilano River in North Vancouver, supplies much of Vancouver and the Lower Mainland’s drinking water. When the dam’s gates are open it’s super exciting to stand on the bridge above and see and hear the torrent of water rushing down the spillway into the river.

To do the hike anti-clockwise, cross the bridge and look for the Upper Shinglebolt Trail. Follow it until you reach a fork in the trail and then turn left. From that point, follow the trail a short way to the Pipe bridge and head across. This part of the trail follows the river so you’ll be treated to some great views no matter what the weather.

On the East side of the river, look for the Coho Loop Trail to the left. Follow it until you reach the salmon hatchery interpretive centre. There are some really cool displays at the center where you can see and learn about the life cycle of salmon. Check out the fish ladders where, depending on the season, you may even see salmon jumping as they head upstream to spawn.

After you leave the hatchery, look for the Palisades Trail to the left. Follow it back up until you hit the service road and then continue up the road until you find yourself back at the dam.

The round trip takes between 1 and 2 hours depending on your speed and how long you spend at the hatchery. I could watch fish jump for hours so I would allow extra time for that. There is a parking lot by the reservoir and the park can also be reached by transit. I highly recommended the Cleveland Dam-hatchery loop as a good starter hike or a regular walk. It’s locally popular so can be quite busy but the people you meet are friendly.

Check out a trail map here.

Hiking to St Mark’s Summit

The St Mark’s Summit hike is an 11km round trip, with 460m elevation and some challenging terrain. The views along the way are amazing but nothing can prepare you for the vistas over Howe Sound from the Summit itself.

The trail to the Summit can be accessed from the Cypress Mountain Downhill parking lot. Head North towards the chairlift and look for signs for the Howe Sound Crest Trail. St Mark’s Summit is 5.5km along the Howe Sound Crest Trail which runs 30km from Cypress Mountain to Porteau Cove.

The Trail begins as gravel but after some time will become a myriad of tree routes and steep switchbacks. Watch your feet carefully. As a novice hiker I found this trail quite challenging and took many short stops to rest. Happily, there are many places where it’s worth stopping to admire the view.

Trees on the side of the trail, Cypress Mountain, Vancouver BC

When you reach the first trail map board look for an opening in the forest to your right. You’ll see a magnificent view of the Lions.

The Lions from Cypress Mountain

There are several peek-a-boo views of the Sound along the way.

View from the trail, Cypress Mountain, Vancouver BC

When you reach St Mark’s Summit you’ll see a marker pole on the trail itself. Turn to your left and scramble up the rocks. From the numerous viewpoints at the edge of the ridge you’ll get incredible vistas of Howe Sound. What makes the scenery even more spectacular are the sheer drop-offs, as the cliffs seem almost vertical, really emphasizing their height.

View over Howe Sound from St Mark's Summit, Vancouver BC

Along with the views, you’re likely to see some wildlife. There was a family of ravens checking us out as we rested at the top.

Raven

Along with a couple of curious chipmunks.

Chipmunks

After about an hour at the top, we began to make our way back. About 2/3 of the way down we came across a tree trunk where previous hikers had marked their passing by stacking small rocks. We each added a rock to the pile to acknowledge the trail before continuing on our way.

Rock pile, Inukshuk

By the time we arrived back at the carpark it was dusk and the temperature had dropped significantly. Although it was a really hot day and we wore T-shirts hiking, we were prepared for the weather to change. Given the mixed terrain and the mountain’s elevation, I’d recommend being fully prepared when tackling this hike. Take plenty of water, warm clothes, a first aid kit and bug spray.

This hike could take anywhere from 4-6 hours depending on fitness, speed and how long you stay at the top. Don’t rush it, it’s worth hanging out at the Summit awhile where you will literally feel on top of the world. I did this hike on my birthday in September and couldn’t think of a better place to be.